Four components to a great PowerPoint presentation

Seth Godin is one of the great marketers of our time. Besides having many best-selling books on the subject, he is also a prolific blogger. And, like any truly great marketer, Godin is also an expert presenter, and has written many times about the principles involved in effective PowerPoint presenting.

What follows is a brief treatment of what Godin calls four components to a great presentation. At the end of this article you will find a link to the full blog post.

First, make yourself cue cards. Don’t put them on the screen. Put them in your hand. Now, you can use the cue cards you made to make sure you’re saying what you came to say.

Second, make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them. Create slides that demonstrate, with emotional proof, that what you’re saying is true.

Third, create a written document — a leave-behind. Then, when you start your presentation, tell audience members that you’re going to give them all the details of your presentation at its conclusion, and that they don’t have to write down everything you say. But do NOT hand out the document before or during your presentation. If you do, audience members will read the handout and ignore your presentation. Instead, your goal is to get them to sit back, trust you and absorb the emotional and intellectual points of your presentation.

Fourth, create a feedback cycle. If your presentation is for a project approval, hand people a project approval form and get them to approve it, so there’s no ambiguity at all about what you’ve all agreed to. The reason you give a presentation is to make a sale. So make it. Don’t leave without a “yes,” or at the very least, a commitment to a date or to future deliverables.

To read Seth Godin’s full blog post click here.

Mike Consol teaches public speaking, PowerPoint presentation skills and business writing to companies and business professionals in the Oakland-San Francisco-San Jose Bay Area. Contact him at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 925-449-1040.

Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules for writing

November 18, 2014 | Writing

Elmore Leonard is one of the most successful detective novelists of all time. Several of his best-selling books — including Get Shorty, Be Cool and Jackie Brown — were turned into successful Hollywood movies. Mr. Leonard entered immortality in 2013, but he left us with 10 rules for writing that will serve us nicely in any type of writing we do. Here is a short summary of the principles that made Elmore Leonard such a successful writer, and can benefit us as well. (Click on the headline to continue reading.)

Tip number 13 for moderating panel discussions

Liven-up your language by punctuating or emphasizing certain words. Otherwise our delivery will tend to be monotone, as though no word is any more important than another. A monotone voice is a dull voice, and it will eventually it will bore an audience to distraction. The other reason to punctuate our words is to … (click on the headline to continue reading).

Why long writing is more effective than short writing when marketing

November 12, 2014 | Marketing, Writing

Conventional wisdom doesn’t always provide us with sage advice. For example, conventional wisdom tells us that it’s always better to write SHORT rather than LONG. There’s just one problem with this piece of advice, it’s patently false. In many instances it’s clearly more effective to write long copy rather than short, such as for direct-response promotional pieces, sales letters, website pages, or copy for many other marketing purposes. The argument over whether long or short copy sells better was settled long ago, though this piece of unconventional wisdom hasn’t filtered to most business people. Decades of testing have shown again and again that long copy outsells short copy. This video explains why. Click on the headline to continue.

Why long writing is more effective than short writing when marketing

November 12, 2014 | Marketing, Writing

Conventional wisdom doesn’t always provide us with sage advice. For example, conventional wisdom tells us that it’s always better to write SHORT rather than LONG. There’s just one problem with this piece of advice, it’s patently false. In many instances it’s clearly more effective to write long copy rather than short, such as for direct-response promotional pieces, sales letters, website pages, or copy for many other marketing purposes. The argument over whether long or short copy sells better was settled long ago, though this piece of unconventional wisdom hasn’t filtered to most business people. Decades of testing have shown again and again that long copy outsells short copy. This video explains why. Click on the headline to continue.

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